AprilPAD Day 2 – A Rejig of Pope

“True ease in writing comes from art, not chance,” by Alexander Pope.

A REJIG OF POPE

True ease in painting comes from art, not chance,
said my father. He was always misquoting,

shifting facts into little white pie in the sky
semi-truths. I reckon he was a true poet

at heart; a kleptomaniac of other peoples’
phrases, other peoples’ lives and experiences,

rejigging them into something to fit
his own version of life. On that day,

I stood shoulder to shoulder with him,
and we painted frothy lipped waves crashing

on the rock jetty near Westport. Yes, he repeated,
loving the sound of his own wisdom too much,

True ease in painting comes from art, not chance.
I looked at my canvas and thought, fat chance.
.
.
.

Miz Quickly’s April PAD NaPoWriMo Challenge, Day 2
http://imprompt.wordpress.com/2013/04/02/april-two/
”True ease in writing comes from art, not chance,” from “An Essay on Criticism (Sound and Sense)” by Alexander Pope
credits: Joseph Harker’s mention of poetic kleptomania

Advertisements

18 thoughts on “AprilPAD Day 2 – A Rejig of Pope

    • My father was an amazing man, Sabra, and I was a very lucky girl to be his daughter. Life was never boring with him.

      Thank you so much for taking the time to read this one, and leave me a comment. 🙂

    • The kleptomaniac reference is credit to Joseph, who used that inference in one of his posts. His use of it struck me a profoundly true. And thank you so very much for following along here. I’ll bake you little crunchy things as soon as I have a kitchen again.

    • Hey, Stan! Lovely to see that you made your way over here. Thank you, both for your support and for leaving a comment. As for Dads, they’re special. 😉

  1. A brilliant poem, Misky! I especially loved:
    “shifting facts into little white pie in the sky
    semi-truths. I reckon he was a true poet”
    and
    “a kleptomaniac of other peoples’
    phrases, other peoples’ lives and experiences,”

  2. My dad was a hoot to live with too. Though I think I recognized early on that what he spoke and what he did were often at odds. I wonder if he ever recognized that?
    And I can’t ask him now…

  3. Ah, Misky, your ability to tell a tale, whether sweet or poignant is always appreciated and enjoyed. This is no different. I would like to have met your father. This is such a fun poem, lathered with childhood trues and memories. Loved it.

Your comments and feedback are welcome!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s